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Public Space Protection Orders (PSPOs) - dog control and legislation

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Dog control

The vast majority of dog owners are caring and responsible. Not only for their pet's well being but also considerate as to the effect their dog has on other residents and visitors to the town.

However, complaints regarding the behaviour of some dog owners and regarding the problem of dog fouling are still regularly received by the councils' Dog Warden Service. Reports and letters in the local newspapers also highlight the frequency and extent of the problem in Adur and Worthing.

To address the concerns and complaints of residents and visitors to the borough both councils have introduced:

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Collar and tag

It is a legal requirement under the Control of Dogs Order 1992 that every dog, while in a public place, must wear a collar with the name and address of its owner inscribed on it, or on a disc attached to the collar. Failure to do so could result in prosecution and a fine of up to £2,000.

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Where dogs are allowed

You can walk your dog in most of Adur and Worthing's streets and open spaces with the exceptions listed below.

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Where dogs are not allowed

Dogs - no dogs sign

Adur and Worthing's Public Space Protection Orders designated certain areas that dogs are not permitted. These include:

  • Enclosed children's play areas
  • Highdown Gardens, Heene Terrace and Crematorium (Worthing)
  • The beach from 'Splash Point' (end of Warwick Road) to Heene Road from 1st May to 30th September each year (Worthing)
  • The beach between the two boat launching ramps in Goring from 1st May to 30th September each year

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Where dogs must be on leads

Dogs - keep on lead sign

Dogs are required to be kept on leads in:

  • all of Adur's and Worthing's streets
  • Allotments
  • Beach House Park (Worthing)
  • Car parks
  • Cemeteries and closed churchyards
  • Church House Grounds (Worthing)
  • Denton Gardens (Worthing)
  • Field Place (Worthing)
  • Marine Gardens (Worthing)
  • Palatine Park (Worthing)
  • The Pier (Worthing)
  • The Promenade from George V to Windsor Road (Worthing)
  • Widewater Lagoon (Adur)

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Dogs and beaches

Adur District has no dog free beaches or time controlled zones. This means that dogs are allowed on all beaches at all times of the year.

Worthing Borough does have two dog free beach areas from the 1st May to 30th September. They are from Splash Point (Warwick Road) to Heene Road and between the two boat launching ramps in Goring. Both areas are sign posted. Dogs that are taken onto our beaches must be kept under strict control at all times and their owners, or the people who are in charge of the dogs, are required to thoroughly clean up after them and to use the dog bins provided

See also:

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Public Space Protection Orders - Dog Control

To address the concerns and complaints of residents and visitors to the borough relating to dog control both councils have introduced Public Space Protection Orders under The Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014.

See also:

These include:

Public Space Protection Orders - Dog Control - Adur:
(with effect from 19th December 2016)

  • The Fouling of Land by Dogs Order (clean up)
  • The Dogs on Lead by Direction Order (put on lead when told by authorised officer)
  • The Dogs on Leads Order (dogs must be on lead)
  • The Dogs Exclusion Order (dogs not allowed)
  • The Dogs (specified maximum) Order (no more than six)

PSPO documents:

see also:

and:

The Dog Control Orders reports:

Public Space Protection Orders - Dog Control - Report (Adur & Worthing) was considered at the Joint Services Committee (JSC) on 11th October 2016:

The decision was to recommend the PSPOs relating to Adur District to the next Full Council Meeting (Monday 24th October 2016) for adoption:

The decision taken at that meeting was to adopt the Public Space Protection Orders - Dog Control (see page 6):

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Public Space Protection Orders - Dog Control - Worthing:
(with effect from 19th December 2016)

  • The Fouling of Land by Dogs Order (clean up)
  • The Dogs on Lead by Direction Order (put on lead when told by authorised officer)
  • The Dogs on Leads Order (dogs must be on lead)
  • The Dogs Exclusion Order (dogs not allowed)
  • The Dogs (specified maximum) Order (no more than six)

PSPO documents:

See also:

and:

The Dog Control Orders reports:

Public Space Protection Orders - Dog Control - Report (Adur & Worthing) was considered at the Joint Services Committee (JSC) on 11th October 2016:

The decision was to recommend the PSPOs relating to Adur District to the next Full Council Meeting (Tuesday 25th October 2016) for adoption:

The decision taken at that meeting was to adopt the Public Space Protection Orders - Dog Control (see page 6):

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Fixed Penalty Notices

Adur District Council and Worthing Borough Council will issue Fixed Penalty Notices (FPNs) to enforce the Public Space Protection Orders (PSPOs) - Dog Control as prescribed by the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014.

The penalty will be £50.

Failure to pay the Fixed Penalty Notice may result in prosecution.

The maximum fine on prosecution for offences under these Orders is currently set at £1,000.

See also:

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Making a complaint

If you need to report a dog control issue please report it now:

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Legislation

Owning a dog places on the owner a number of obligations beyond the general duty of care for your animal.

There are numerous acts of parliament and variety of regulation that affect dog ownership and here is a brief guide to the main responsibilities placed on a dog owner by the law:

  • Identification - Control of Dogs Order 1992
    You are required to provide your dog with an identity disc or collar inscribed with a name and address in case the dog is lost. If your dog does stray, you should contact your Local Authority Dog Warden immediately or if out of hours or at a weekend contact the Councils out of hours service.
    See also:Identification - Control of Dogs Order 1992 - on the UK Legislation website
  • The Environmental Protection Act 1990
    This Act allows Local Authorities to seize stray dogs and recover their costs before the dog is returned to the owner. It also allows the council to re-home the dog after seven days if the dog is not claimed. Action against noisy dogs can also be taken under this act.
    See also: Environmental Protection Act 1990 - on the UK Legislation website
  • Animal Welfare Act 2006
    This Act places responsibility on the owner to meet their pets welfare needs, these include:
    - A proper diet (including water)
    - Somewhere suitable to live
    - Any need to be housed with, or apart from other animals
    - Allowing animals to express their natural behaviour
    - Protection from pain, suffering and disease
    Prosecution can lead to fines or imprisonment.
    See also: Animal Welfare Act 2006 - on the UK Legislation website
  • Control - Dangerous Dogs Act 1991
    The main aim is to stamp out specific breeds of dog which have been bred for fighting. In this respect the Act applies to the Pit Bull Terrier, Japanese Tosa, Dogo Argintino, or Fila Braziliero. But it also allows for the same penalties to be applied to any dog proved, in court, to be a danger. This will mean a mandatory destruction of the dog and possibly six months in prison and/or a level 5 fine (at present £5,000) for the owner.
    See also: Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 - on the UK Legislation website
  • Town Police Clauses Act 1847
    This makes it an offence to allow any unmuzzled ferocious dog to be left at large, or set on or to urge any dog to attack, worry or put in fear any person or animal in the street.
    See also: Town Police Clauses Act 1847 - on the UK Legislation website
  • The Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014
    This Act allows Local Authorities to make Public Space Protection Orders.
    For more information see Public Space Protection Orders - Dog Control (above).
    See also: Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 - on the UK Legislation website
  • Dogs Act 1871
    Under this Act a magistrate's court may, upon the complaint of any person that a dog is dangerous and not kept under proper control, order the owner to keep the dog under proper control or may order the dog to be destroyed if the evidence proves that it is, in fact, dangerous.
    See also: Dogs Act 1871 - on the UK Legislation website
  • Animals Act 1971
    Under this Act a dog may be shot, without warning by a farmer for worrying his livestock.
    See also: Animals Act 1971 - on the UK Legislation website
  • Road Traffic Act 1988
    This makes it an offence to have a dog on a designated road without the dog being held on a lead. (All of Adur and Worthing's roads are designated).
    See also: Road Traffic Act 1988 - on the UK Legislation website
  • Guard Dogs Act 1975
    It is an offence to use or permit the use of a guard dog on any premises unless the handler, who is capable of controlling the dog, is present on the premises and the dog is under their control. The dog must be secured so that it is not at liberty to go about the premises. A warning that a guard dog is present must clearly be exhibited at each entrance to the premises.
    See also: Guard Dogs Act 1975 - on the UK Legislation website

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